Student Research Analysts

 

Fall 2016 Student Research Analysts

During the Fall 2016 semester, twenty-four student Research Analysts were hired to work at the FEI.  The following is a list of students, their faculty advisors, and a brief description of the research projects in which they were involved or the type of tutoring they provided:

LAIRA AGGARWAL ’19 worked with Professor Angela Vossmeyer on a project involving systemic risk and network structure to trace the evolution (destruction and rebuilding) of the banking correspondent network system during the Great Depression and make comparisons to the recent structure.

 

 

 

BHAVIKA BOORAGADDA ’18 worked with Professor Angela Vossmeyer on a project involving systemic risk and network structure to trace the evolution (destruction and rebuilding) of the banking correspondent network system during the Great Depression and make comparisons to the recent structure.

 

 

 

AMBERISH CHITRE ’18 was working with Professor Joshua Rosett to build custom equity indices in Bloomberg to investigate whether the performance of companies that are headquartered in a specific region reflect economic growth within that region.  Analysis will be done by region and sector within California.  Rish was also the Bloomberg tutor in the FEI Lab.

 

 

 

JOHN EVERETT ’19 was working with Professor Andrew Finley on a project concerned with the impact of fraud allegations on executive compensation in public accounting.  He also worked with Professor Eric Hughson, later in the semester, on a project examining momentum crashes and monetary policy.

 

 

 

ZIJIN (LYDIA) FU ’18 worked with Professor Joshua Rosett and Professor George Batta on a paper that examines the impact of off-balance-sheet obligations on U.S. corporate bond spread using a modified Merton Structure Model that incorporates off-balance-sheet obligations in companies’ face value of debt.  She also worked on a project with Professor Rosett about the impact of 150-hour rule on CPA exam performance in different states.

 

 

QIANYUN (CAROLE) GAO ’17 worked with Professor Sven Arndt to continue a project on cross-border financial intermediation, credit conditions and asset-price volatility.  She also assisted in a related project testing the hypothesis that certain types of cross-border networking reduce the sensitivity of a nation’s trade balance to variations in exchange rates.  The specific case involves U.S.-Mexico production sharing in certain industries.  Carole also worked with Professor Darren Filson on two projects: assessing the optimal structure and characteristics of target-date funds, and dissecting the R&D efficiency anomaly to explain the abnormal stock market performance of portfolios constructed on the basis of high R&D efficiency.

 

JINLIN (DENNIS) GU ’17 worked with Professor Eric Hughson on a project entitled, “Is Fed Policy Finance Friendly: The Relations between Monetary Policy Shocks and Sectoral Stock Returns.”

 

 

 

 

 

MATTHIEU HAFEMEISTER ’17 worked on a project with Professor Joshua Rosett involving reporting and analyzing trends on Mergers and Acquisitions in Southern California.  He was also the Capital IQ tutor at the FEI.

 

 

 

AMY INGRAM ’17 worked with Professor Angela Vossmeyer on a project involving systemic risk and network structure to trace the evolution (destruction and rebuilding) of the banking correspondent network system during the Great Depression and make comparisons to the recent structure.

 

 

 

ANANT JAITHA ’17 worked with Professor Ananda Ganguly developing a web application to conduct and record the results of an experiment on the effect of different kinds of accounting reports on investors’ belief formation and trading activity.

 

 

 

YUTAO (JAMES) JIANG ’19 worked on a project with Professor Eric Helland that examined the additional safety effects of a mass litigation on pharmaceuticals.  In particular, the study, which examines over 30 years of litigation and adverse events data, can provide evidence on the marginal value of litigation beyond the FDA’s safety regime.

 

 

KANISHK KAPUR ’18 worked on two projects for Professor George Batta.  The first one is attempting estimate accounting conservatism using structural modeling techniques.  As a basis of comparison, Kanishk estimated accounting conservatism using (mainly) regression-based techniques.  In the second project, he gathered data on corporate defaults in Bloomberg, for a project Professor Batta and Professor Fan Yu are working on that explores the effect of credit default swap trading initiation on firm investment and debt issuance.

 

ANDREW LINDQUIST ’19 worked on a project with Professor Eric Helland that examined the additional safety effects of a mass litigation on pharmaceuticals.  In particular, the study, which examines over 30 years of litigation and adverse events data, can provide evidence on the marginal value of litigation beyond the FDA’s safety regime.  In addition, Andrew scraped data for a paper Professor Helland presented at George Mason entitled, “OSHA, State Ergonomics Regulations, and Federal Relations.”

 

 

MINGDA LIU ’17 worked with Professor Joshua Rosett to oversee the content and the maintenance of the FEI website.

 

 

 

 

NAYANTARA (NAINA) MULLICK ’17 was the Excel tutor at the FEI Lab.

 

 

 

 

 

 

HUNTER OLSEN ’18 worked on a project with Professor Andrew Finley researching career outcomes of former Big 4 and Arthur Andersen employees to evaluate long-run effects of forced entry into the accounting labor market.  Later in the semester, he worked with Professor Angela Vossmeyer on a project involving systemic risk and network structure to trace the evolution (destruction and rebuilding) of the banking correspondent network system during the Great Depression and make comparisons to the recent structure.

 

HAMSA SRIKANTH ’19 worked on a project with Professor Eric Helland that examined the additional safety effects of a mass litigation on pharmaceuticals.  In particular, the study, which examines over 30 years of litigation and adverse events data, can provide evidence on the marginal value of litigation beyond the FDA’s safety regime.

 

 

YIZHOU (JACK) TAO ’18 worked with Professor Ananda Ganguly developing a web application to conduct and record the results of an experiment on the effect of different kinds of accounting reports on investors’ belief formation and trading activity.

 

 

 

AARUSHI TIBREWALA ’18 worked on a project with Professor Eric Helland that examined the additional safety effects of a mass litigation on pharmaceuticals.  In particular, the study, which examines over 30 years of litigation and adverse events data, can provide evidence on the marginal value of litigation beyond the FDA’s safety regime.

 

 

YULANG (DANNY) WANG ’18 worked with Professor Darren Filson to further research different factors that could identify anomalies in asset pricing.  Danny was also the Python tutor at the FEI.

 

 

 

PETER WELCH ’18 worked on a project with Professor Eric Helland that examined the additional safety effects of a mass litigation on pharmaceuticals.  In particular, the study, which examines over 30 years of litigation and adverse events data, can provide evidence on the marginal value of litigation beyond the FDA’s safety regime.  In addition, Peter worked on a paper for Professor Helland entitled, “The Value of an Attorney: Evidence from Changes to the Collateral Source Rule.”

 

 

 

ALBERT XU ’17 worked with Professor Laura Grant on a project titled, “Strategic responses to third-party ratings: Theory and evidence from charities,” which considers how third-party ratings affect the decisions of rated charities, including overall giving.

 

 

 

ANDREW YEH ’17 was the Stata tutor in the FEI Lab.

 

 

 

 

 

2015-2016 Student Research Analysts

2014-2015 Student Research Analysts